8 Things To Remember After A Breakup

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There is a life and a world that exists beyond your ended relationship.

You can still move on in life and eventually seek the happiness that you’re looking for.

Just remember that you survived a life without being in a relationship and you should have no problems going back to that life.

To go along with that kind of mentality, you should also supplement your demeanor with these other tips to help you get through your breakup in a healthy and haste manner.

1.  You don’t have to do this alone.

You have friends and family, and if no one is available, consider going to a trained professional or joining a support group.

Be careful not to lean too hard on those who are close to you.

Friends can burn out if your sadness goes on for too long.

2. Don’t go on dealing with your breakup thinking that everything was your fault.

You have to learn to let go of the blame.

You have to stop blaming yourself.

You can’t allow yourself to go on in life carrying that kind of guilt with you.

Some relationships just don’t last and no one has to be at fault. Sometimes, the universe just throws a few curve balls our way and we have to make do with whatever we’re given.

3. You still have full control over your life.

You are still the master of your fate and captain of your soul.

You still have sole ownership of your life and everything that happens to you from here on out is entirely up to you.

You are the one who gets to decide whether you will be happy or sad.

You are the one who gets to decide whether you’re going to be sulking and unproductive or if you’re going to move on and live your life the way that you’re meant to.

4. Let your feelings out.

If you need to cry, do it.

If you are hurting, try writing about your feelings.

It’s a great way to get out of your head, and it will help heal your heart.

The important thing to remember is not to just sit on your feelings, because pain will hang around if you let it.

5. Be grateful for the experience and keep an eye for the future.

Regardless of the fact that it had an unfortunate conclusion, your relationship was still a real one and you should still be grateful for that experience.

It doesn’t matter that things didn’t end up the way that you wanted it to.

You still had your good moments.

And more importantly, you still have the lessons that you gained because of it.

You can use the lessons that you’ve taken from this experience to help you move on to become a better and stronger human being.

6. Use this unexpected opportunity to spend more time with yourself.

When you were in a relationship, you had to share your time.

It was one of your responsibilities. It came with the package and you had no choice.

You had to make a few compromises here and there and you never really could act on your own accord.

But now that you’re single, you have all of the time for yourself.

You can now do and act in ways that you never could when you were in a relationship.

take this time to build yourself to the person you’ve always wanted to become.

7. Know that you will feel love again 

If you are a loving person and want to share your heart with a deserving partner, please keep that image in your mind.

It will help you make it happen.

8. Don’t hold back from expressing yourself whenever the need arises. 

Channel your emotions in a productive manner. You have to be able to express yourself whenever you feel the need to.

There’s no point in keeping your emotions in.

There’s no point in trying to suppress or neglect them. Don’t be someone who just sweeps emotions under the rug in the hopes that they eventually go away.

They never leave you unless you actually learn to face them head on. If you want to feel sad, then allow yourself to just be human and let the sadness flow through you.

If you are upset and angry at the situation, find proper outlets for you to vent your anger out.

Find a friend to talk to and express yourself through words. Just make sure that you don’t end up hurting anyone else in the process.

Source:  Relrules  ,  Psychology Today